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Miami Circle Video

The Miami Circle is a relic from Miami’s 2,000 year old history. An ancient Tequesta trading post, The Miami Circle is a beautiful green space in the heart of Downtown Miami. Learn more on this episode of ArtStreet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6NjWZ09uus

Mystery of Miami Circle Documentary from the BBC

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlnWuS8TODk

Miami Circle

Historic preservation specialist John M. Ricisak holds two prehistoric axe heads Dec. 29, 1998, believed to be made by Tequesta Indians, who were believed to have inhabitated the area near the Miami River in downtown Miami. John Beriault, left and Dr. Curtis McKinney, center, Professor of Geology at Florida International University , sift through the ground at an area of a mysterious circle found in the prehistoric ruins of the now extinct tribe.

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/palm-beach/delray-beach/sfl-archaeological-sites-in-florida-pictures-2-004,0,4538612.photo

Miami Circle

Historic preservation specialist John M. Ricisak holds two prehistoric axe heads Dec. 29, 1998, believed to be made by Tequesta Indians, who were believed to have inhabitated the area near the Miami River in downtown Miami. John Beriault, left and Dr. Curtis McKinney, center, Professor of Geology at Florida International University , sift through the ground at an area of a mysterious circle found in the prehistoric ruins of the now extinct tribe.

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/palm-beach/delray-beach/sfl-archaeological-sites-in-florida-pictures-2-004,0,4538612.photo

Miami Circle

Miami Circle

Miami Food Heritage Site: Miami Circle

It was a muggy Miami day in September of 1998 when a survey team arrived for a routine investigation at a 2.06 acre parcel of land near the southern bank of the Miami River.

Already, the land held historic significance. It may have once been part of the Brickell Hammock, a coastal tropical hardwood forest. It also stood as part of the original property where the pioneering Brickell family established a trading post in South Florida during the 1870s. It had been cleared in the early 19th century and was planted with a coconut palm grove that existed until 1949. In the 1950s, it held six low-rise apartment buildings that were razed in 1998. Now, it was preparing for its latest tenants: two high rise apartment buildings that developers were eager to begin building.

The discovery of several unique carvings in the bedrock beneath the site halted any attempts at construction.

Scientists decided to investigate this mysterious area further. In December 1998 the team fully realized the extent of what they had found. A complete circle, with a diameter of 38 feet, had been carved into the bedrock. Many believe the find, now dubbed the “Miami Circle”, is very significant. It is one of the most complete prehistoric structural footprints cut into bedrock within the eastern part of North America.

The Miami Circle is characterized by 24 rectangular basins ranging in size from one foot to about three feet in length, varying in width between 18 and 24 inches. Most are cut to a depth of 12 to 18 inches below the bedrock’s surface. The contents found within the basins include limestone rocks, black midden soil, animal bone, marine shell, and the occasional artifact.

In addition to these cut basins are more than 500 circular post holds that have been documented within the vicinity of the Miami Circle (http://www.nps.gov/bisc/miamicircle.htm).

Source: http://starkimages.homestead.com/miamicircle.html


Also discovered were a buried shark and sea turtle, an eye motif cut into the rock, a basaltic ax offering, and other items suggesting that the circle had ceremonial significance. Radiocarbon dating, testing two charcoal samples selected from the cut basins and the midden within the circle, put the site’s origin to circa 100 C.E.

Miami Food Heritage Site: Miami Circle

Miami Beach History: Farms to Resorts and the importance of the Collins Bridge to Miami

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8tOjalGnkk

Miami Beach Food Heritage Site: Joe’s Stone Crabs Restaurant

Miami Beach Food Heritage Site: Joe’s Stone Crabs Restaurant

Stone Crab History: Shellfish for the Softhearted

Seafood for the softhearted. As only the sweet, white claw meat of this warm water crustacean is eaten, fishermen twist the claws off and throw the crab back in the sea. The claws regenerate after about 18 months, although the new claw—known as a retread—is smaller than the original. Fisherman typically leave each crab with one claw so it can defend itself. James Peterson wrote in Fish & Shellfish that he was “shocked” the first time he saw the claws for sale because he assumed, mistakenly, that the crustacean had been killed for a relatively small amount of meat. The crabs, considered a delicacy today, were popularized 80 years ago at Joe’s Stone Crab Restaurant in Miami Beach, now a historical landmark. You eat them, usually cold, by cracking the shell with a mallet and dipping the succulent meat in sauce.  Source: http://www.jamesbeard.org/blog/eat-word-stone-crabs

Stone Crab History: Shellfish for the Softhearted

Seafood for the softhearted. As only the sweet, white claw meat of this warm water crustacean is eaten, fishermen twist the claws off and throw the crab back in the sea. The claws regenerate after about 18 months, although the new claw—known as a retread—is smaller than the original. Fisherman typically leave each crab with one claw so it can defend itself. James Peterson wrote in Fish & Shellfish that he was “shocked” the first time he saw the claws for sale because he assumed, mistakenly, that the crustacean had been killed for a relatively small amount of meat. The crabs, considered a delicacy today, were popularized 80 years ago at Joe’s Stone Crab Restaurant in Miami Beach, now a historical landmark. You eat them, usually cold, by cracking the shell with a mallet and dipping the succulent meat in sauce. Source: http://www.jamesbeard.org/blog/eat-word-stone-crabs

Florida Stone Crabs: Season begins October 15 runs to May 15

"The onset of winter in Florida not only brings wonderfully mild sunny weather but also the eagerly anticipated annual harvest of stone crab claws. The Crustacean Fisheries group at the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI) is responsible for monitoring the commercial stone crab fishery along with conducting research on the population of stone crabs in Florida. The widespread popularity of stone crab claws leads many people to inquire about this unique Florida resource. The following are a list of frequently asked questions about this resource."

http://myfwc.com/research/saltwater/crustaceans/stone-crabs/faq/